Neurogenetics of Vocal Communication Group -

News

Scientists try to unravel the mystery of ‘animal conversations’

African elephants like to rumble, naked mole rats trade soft chirps, while fireflies alternate flashes in courtship dialogues. Welcome to the weird and wonderful world of ‘animal conversations’. An international team of academics undertook a large-scale review of research into turn-taking behaviour in animal communication, analysing hundreds of animal studies.

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Celebrating our successful junior researchers

At the MPI, we strive to guide and train the next generation of academics. This week, four young researchers are placed in the spotlight after winning awards at an international level. Their awarded work showcases the diversity of language research done at our Institute - varying from studying bat calls to the way in which language colours the information of our senses.

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Defect in non-coding DNA might trigger brain disorders such as severe language impairment

Genetic variation in the non-coding DNA could give rise to language impairments in children and other neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism, and bipolar disorder, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics and Radboud University in Nijmegen found. Molecular Psychiatry publishes their work based on a new approach on March 14.

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Neurogenetics of Vocal Communication Group -

Bat transcriptome paper in list of most influential articles of 2015

A paper on bat transcriptomics by researchers from the Neurogenetics of Vocal Communication group has been listed as one of the most influential papers of 2015 in the journal 'BMC Genomics'.

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Neurogenetics of Vocal Communication Group -

Bat genes could provide fresh clues about the neurobiology of human speech

Although humans are the only species with the ability to use sophisticated spoken language, some of the characteristic features of language are also present in the communication systems of other animals. A new study led by the Neurogenetics of Vocal Communication group at the MPI for Psycholinguistics shows that bats in particular could provide novel insights into the biological basis of human language.

Bat genes could provide fresh clues about the neurobiology of human speech - Read More…

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