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Many Paths to Language (MPaL) -

Program overview

Get a copy of the complete handbook (including the program and talk abstracts) here.

Friday, October 6th, 2017

08.15 Registration & coffee

08:45 Welcome

09.00

Invited talk: Erika Hoff (Florida Atlantic University)

Sources of variation in bilingual development are both different from and the same as sources of variation in monolingual development

Children who are exposed to two languages from birth vary widely in the rate at which they acquire each language and in the level of language proficiency they ultimately achieve. This talk will present research that identifies sources of that variability. The data come from studies of children and adults raised in Spanish-English bilingual homes in South Florida, in the U.S.

Sources of variability can be identified at two levels of proximity to the child. Distal sources of variation in trajectories of bilingual development include parents’ language backgrounds and language proficiencies, parents’ levels of education, the presence of older siblings in the home, and the societal status of each language. These multiple distal factors exert their influence via three proximal factors: the quantity of input children receive in each language, the quality of that input, and the children’s use of each language in communication.

The implications of these findings for understanding the mechanisms that drive language learning echo earlier conclusions, which were reached from the study of variation in monolingual development. That is, in order to acquire language, children need to see that the language serves a communicative function and they need access to informative primary linguistic data.  Children have the ability to acquire language or languages to the extent that their circumstances of language exposure meet those conditions.

 

10.00 Coffee break

10.30–12.20 Talk session

10:30

Ellen Verhoef, Chin Yang Shapland, Simon E. Fisher, Beate St Pourcain

The genetic architecture of expressive and receptive vocabulary in early childhood

10:50

Camila Scaff, Florencia Alam, Alejandrina Cristia, Celia Renata Rosemberg

SES and word comprehension: a cross-cultural study using touch screens

11:10

Aurelie Nardy, Jean-Pierre Chevrot, Eric Fleury, Marton Karsai

Social interactions and language development at preschool: benefits from interdisciplinarity, proximity sensors and big data

11:30


Sharon Unsworth, Barbora Skarabela, Vicky Chondrogianni

Exploring language dominance in bilingual children: language exposure and use vs. relative proficiency

11:50

Naomi Havron, Inbal Arnon

Literacy as a source of variance in language processing and acquisition

12:10

Eileen Graf, Marc Hernandez, Susan True, Timothy Leffel, Lekha Venkataraman

Predicting low-income children’s language outcomes

12.30 Lunch

13.30 Break-out work sessions

Room

 Chairs

Topic

163

Inbal Arnon, Caroline Junge, Carlijn van den Boomen

Individual differences in first language acquisition

336

Christina Bergmann, Hillary Ganek, Camila Scaff, Iris-Corinna Schwarz

Data collection and analysis: Design and hardware

A229

Rana Abu-Zhaya, Molly Flaherty, Eileen Graf

Multivariate, multimodal approaches to diversity

 

15.00 Coffee break

15.30 Poster highlights: The presenters of posters 1, 2, 6, 19, and 21 will each provide a 2-minute overview of their work.

16.00–18.00 Poster session

#

Authors

Title

1

Joanna Kolak, Sonia Granlund, Virve Vihman, Felix Engelmann, Ben Ambridge, Julian Pine, Anna Theakston, Elena Lieven

An experimental study on the acquisition of nominal case marking in Estonian, Finnish and Polish

2

Jidong Chen, Penelope Brown, Bhuvana Narasimhan

A crosslinguistic study of semantic development in ‘Cutting’, ‘Breaking’ and ‘Tearing’ categories

3

Marisa Casillas, Penelope Brown, Stephen C. Levinson

Early word learning environments: Evidence from Mayan and Papua New Guinean households

4

Sigal Uziel-Karl

The development of agent-oriented modality: Evidence from child Hebrew

5

Shanley Allen, Mary Elliott

Learning morphemes in a morphologically complex language: Do Inuktitut-speaking parents simplify utterances to help children break into morphology?

6

Rowena Garcia, Jens Roeser, Jeruen E. Dery, Barbara Höhle

Thematic role assignment in Tagalog acquisition: Use of word order and morphosyntactic markers

7

Cynthia Pamela Audisio, Alejandrina Cristia

Assessing the noun counting strategy postulated by the syntactic bootstrapping approach in the input to Spanish-learning children

8

Susana Mendive, Mayra Mascareño, Daniela Aldoney, Jose Pezoa

Trajectories of vocabulary growth in Chilean low-SES families: family and instructional factors

9

Gianmatteo Farabolini, Camila Scaff

The impact of socioeconomic status on infants' spontaneous speech: A meta-analysis

10

Christina Bergmann

Characterizing talker variability in everyday life of urban, high SES 4- to 12-month-olds

11

Christina Bergmann, Sho Tsuji

Everyday input variability affects word recognition at 11 but not 16 months

12

Sharifeh Younesian, Karen A. Sullivan, Linda Gilmore, Fariba Yadegari

Maternal Interactive Beliefs Predict Toddler’s Language Acquisition

13

Julie M. Schneider, Mandy J. Maguire

Socioeconomic status differences in children’s resting state EEG are correlated to vocabulary size

14

Naomi Havron, Alex de Carvahlo, Axel Barrault, Anne Christophe

Syntactic adaptation as a mechanism that drives and supports child language acquisition

15

Elin Larsen, Emmanuel Dupoux, Alejandrina Cristia

Understanding the role of monosyllabic function words in a word segmentation algorithm based on transitional probabilities on syllables and its correlation to reported vocabulary acquisition

16

Mrudula Arunkumar, Annamalai Arunkumar

Investigating Cryptophasia to Explain Language Development in Twins: A Pilot Study

17

Shira Tal, Inbal Arnon

SES Differences in the Structure of Child-directed Speech

18

Laura E. Hahn, Titia Benders, Tineke M. Snijders, Paula Fikkert

Infants' sensitivity to rhyme in songs

19

Aoju Chen, Huub van den Bergh

Towards understanding individual differences in acquisition of prosodic focus-marking

20

Chantal van Dijk, Sharon Unsworth, Tom Dijkstra

Processing of passive and V2 structures by 5 to 9 year old Dutch-speaking children

21

Imme Lammertink, Merel Van Witteloostuijn, Paul Boersma, Frank Wijnen, Judith Rispens

Online learning of nonadjacent dependencies in children with and without Specific Language Impairment

22

Pauline Frizelle, Paul Thompson, Michaela Duta, Dorothy Bishop

Assessing children’s understanding of complex syntax: a comparison of two methods

23

Mireille Babineau, Camille Legrand, Rushen Shi

The case of multiple variants for vowel-initial words in French: Parental input and children’ lexical representation

24

Iris-Corinna Schwarz, Ulrika Marklund, Ellen Marklund

Contingency differences in parent-infant turn-taking between primary and secondary caregivers in relation to turn-taking experience

25

Laurence Buson, Aurélie Nardy, Emilie Charles, Jean-Pierre Chevrot

Acquisition of sociolinguistic style -- Exploring how children process the variation present in their language environment

18.00 Closing

 

 

 

Saturday, October 7th, 2017

08.30 Registration & coffee

09.00

Invited talk: Damián Blasi (University of Zurich)

Small data and big questions

In spite of the enormous insights gained by experimental and simulation studies, a large portion of our understanding of language acquisition is based on observational data. This century brought with it a host of new methodological and theoretical strategies to analyze and understand data in unprecedented scales. In particular, the analysis of large volumes of data has become feasible and it is now an active and blossoming field of research.

Yet, with a few exceptions, observational data in language acquisition is small: studies supported by a small number of children, languages, or instances of the same linguistic token (to name a few relevant dimensions of variation, Stoll 2015) are still frequent. The logic behind classic (frequentist) statistics forbid us from making inferences in many of such cases, and the risks of underpowered studies are well-known (Gelman and Carlin 2014).

In this presentation, I will argue that a very promising way around this issue is to embrace Bayesian statistics as the standard philosophy of analysis when facing small data. I will discuss the potential gains and pitfalls of Bayesian statistics and how it relates to a tighter relation of the researcher with previous work. I will illustrate these points with the problem of measuring morphological and lexical productivity based on a longitudinal corpora of diverse typological profile (Moran et al. 2016).

 

10.00 Coffee break

10.30–12.20 Talk session

10:30

Ana M. Carmiol, Alison Sparks, Luis Diego Conejo-Bolaños

Reminiscing and book sharing and their links with children’s language and literacy development in Costa Rica

10:50

Laia Fibla, Alejandrina Cristia

The impact of bilingual input on infant word segmentation: A computational approach

11:10

Marieke van Heugten, Elizabeth K. Johnson

Input matters: Multi-accent language input affects word form recognition in infancy

11:30

Nayeli Gonzalez-Gomez

Early language development under difficult circumstances: Exploring maturational and environmental factors

11:50

Rachel R. Romeo, Julia A. Leonard, Sydney T. Robinson, Allyson P. Mackey, Meredith L. Rowe, John Gabrieli

Structural and functional neural mechanisms underlying the relationship between children’s language exposure and their linguistic abilities

12:10

Evelyne Mercure

Plasticity in the neural representation of language: Insights from hearing infants with Deaf mothers

12.30 Lunch

13.30 Break-out work sessions

Room

 Chairs

Topic

163

Shanley Allen, Evan Kidd, Nayeli Gonzalez-Gomez

Theoretical implications of variation

336

Christina Bergmann, Hillary Ganek, Camila Scaff, Iris-Corinna Schwarz

Data collection and analysis: Transcription and annotation

236

Aoju Chen, Joanna Kolak, Barbara Pfeiler

Cross-linguistic comparison methods

15.00 Coffee break

15.30 Poster highlights: The presenters of posters 4, 8, 11, 16, and 22 will each provide a 2-minute overview of their work.

16.00–18.00 Poster session

#

Author(s)

Title

1

Elise van Wonderen, Sharon Unsworth

Using cross-linguistic lexical tasks to compare individual variation in language proficiency across and within bilingual children

2

Emily Oxley, Anna Weighall

Does knowledge of more than one language enhance the ability to learn novel words?

3

Helena Levy, Adriana Hanulíková

Long-term effects of accent exposure on perception and production

4

Magdalena Smoczyńska, Marcin Szczerbiński

A follow-up study of Polish Late Talkers: SLI and reading/writing difficulties in children aged 5;6 to 10;0

5

Charleen List

Testing two different models of verb-marking error in children with Developmental Language Disorder and language-matched controls

6

Tineke M. Snijders, Titia Benders, Caroline Junge, Saskia Haegens, Paula Fikkert

Relating infants’ sensitivity to rhythm at 7.5 months to their speech segmentation ability at 9 months

7

Anna M. Kolesnik, Jannath Begum, Tony Charman, Emily Jones, Mark Johnson

Reduced habitation of auditory gamma in infancy indexes ASD risk and associated language difficulty

8

Molly Flaherty, Susan Goldin-Meadow

The Effects of Gesture Input on the Development of Child Homesign

9

Hillary Ganek, Alice Eriks-Brophy, Stephanie Nixon, Ron Smyth

A mixed methods investigation of conversational turns in Canadian and Vietnamese families of children with and without hearing loss

10

Margriet Anna Groen, Alexandra Jesse

Audiovisual Speech Perception in Children With and Without a History of Otitis Media and Its Relation to Phonological Awareness

11

Beyza Sümer, Clara Grabitz, Aylin Küntay

Early produced signs are iconic: Evidence from Turkish Sign Language

12

Angela Grimminger, Carina Lüke, Ute Ritterfeld, Ulf Liszkowski, Katharina Rohlfing

Individual differences in the use of pointing-speech-combinations in 14- to 16-month-old children

13

Ellen Marklund, Iris-Corinna Schwarz

MMR categorization effect at 8 months is related to receptive vocabulary size at 12 to 14 months

14

Seamus Donnelly, Evan Kidd

Examining the Stability of Individual Differences in Early Lexical Processing

15

Olga Vasileva

Language Variation. Insights and Development.

16

Ulrika Marklund, Francisco Lacerda, Anna Persson, Anette Lohmander

Word selection for the test PEEPS-SE - Profiles of Early Expressive Phonological Skills for Swedish

17

Elliot Murphy

Developmental Stages of Complex Polysemy: Libraries, Lunches, and Theseus

18

Laura De Ruiter, Anna Theakston, Elena Lieven, Silke Brandt

``You say `before’, I say `bevor’’’ Testing the relative influence of iconicity, ambiguity, and language-specific frequencies on the processing of complex sentences in English and German

19

Samantha-Kaye Christie

Reading development and developmental dyslexia

20

Cecilia Rojas Nieto

A tale of four children learning Spanish verb inflection: Teasing apart the threads of cumulative morphemes

21

Sevcan Ayaş Köksal

Does exposure to storyteller's gestures while listening to a story create a difference on listener's narrative skills?

22

Inbal Arnon

Individual and Modality-based Differences in Children's Statistical Learning Abilities

18.00 Closing

 

 

 

Sunday, October 8th, 2017

08.30 Registration & coffee

09.00

Invited talk: Elena Lieven (ESRC International Centre for

Language and Communicative Development (LuCiD),

University of Manchester)

Why study language and communicative development in non-Weird (White, Educated, Industrialised, Rich, Democratic) societies?

To gain a full understanding of the processes involved in developing communicative and linguistic skills, we need to move beyond the societies and cultural groups that are our usual focus of study. In this talk, I will first review theoretical proposals relating to the necessary and sufficient conditions for successful language development and explore how information from a wider range of language and cultures could help to identify these. I will then examine the theoretical and methodological issues that arise when we move beyond the small range of cultures usually studied.

 

10.00 Coffee break

10.30–12.20 Talk session

10:30

Barbara Pfeiler, Clifton Pye

Variation at the Left Edge: Child Ergative Production in Teenek and Yucatec Maya

10:50

Felix Engelmann, Sonia Granlund, Joanna Kolak, Ben Ambridge, Julian Pine, Anna Theakston, Elena Lieven

Cross-linguistic acquisition of complex verb inflection in a neural network model

11:10

Monika Abels, Paul Vogt

Interactional experiences of pre- and early verbal Hadza infants in Tanzania

11:30

Alina Kholodova, Michelle Lowe, Caroline Rowland, Shanley Allen

Syntactic priming in a structurally biased language: The role of cross-linguistic differences in language learning

11:50

Rana Abu-Zhaya, Maria Kondaurova, Amanda Seidl, Derek Houston

Maternal speech and touch input to children with hearing impairments and their age matching peers

12:10

Lucia Benetti, Eugenia Costa-Giomi

Infants' Music Environments and Language Learning

12.30 Lunch

13.30 General discussion session

14.30 Closing remarks

15.00 Closing

Last checked 2017-10-07 by Marisa Casillas

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