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Nijmegen Lectures 2010 -

Lecturer and discussants

This year's lecturer Aniruddh D. Patel is Senior Fellow at The Neurosciences Institute in San Diego, California.  Patel received a Ph.D. in biology from Harvard University, where he studied with Edward O. Wilson.  His research focuses on how the brain processes music and language, a topic he has pursued with a variety of techniques, including neuroimaging, theoretical analyses, acoustic research, and comparative studies of nonhuman animals.  He has published over 40 research articles and a scholarly book, Music, Language, and the Brain, which won the 2008 ASCAP Deems-Taylor Award.  Patel is president of the US Society for Music Perception and Cognition.

 

The discussants on December 6

Usha Goswami is Professor of Cognitive Developmental Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of St John’s College, Cambridge. She is also Director of the Centre for Neuroscience in Education, which carries out research into the brain basis of literacy, numeracy, dyslexia and dyscalculia. Her current research examines relations between phonology, reading and dyslexia, with special reference to auditory processing and to the neural underpinnings of rhyme and rhythm. She has received a number of career awards, including the British Psychology Society Spearman Medal, the Norman Geschwind-Rodin Prize for Dyslexia research, and Research Fellowships from the Harkness Foundation (US/UK), National Academy of Education (USA), the Leverhulme Trust (UK) and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (Germany).

Henkjan Honing is Professor of Music Cognition at the University of Amsterdam (UvA), affiliated with the Department of Musicology, the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation (ILLC), and the Cognitive Science Center Amsterdam (CSCA) of that University. He holds a KNAW-Muller Chair designated on behalf of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW). His research focuses on the temporal aspects of music (such as rhythm, timing, and tempo), the role of perception, attention, expectation and memory in the process of listening to music, as well as the cognitive mechanisms underlying musicality. His research involves the use of theoretical, empirical and computational methods. Honing has authored over 150 international publications in the area of music cognition and music technology, and has recently published a book for the general public entitled Iedereen is muzikaal. Wat we weten over het luisteren naar muziek (Nieuw Amsterdam, 2009). A English translation will be published in 2011 with the title Musical Cognition: The Science of Listening.

Lawrence Parsons is a professor of cognitive neuroscience at the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom. He was trained in cognitive and neural sciences at UCSD and MIT, and was associate professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center. From 2001-2003, he was responsible for establishing a cognitive neuroscience program at the National Science Foundation.  His early work on action, spatial reasoning, and object recognition, was followed by recent research on neural basis of reasoning, music and dance performance, joint action (duetting, conversation), improvisation, language, emotion, and cerebellar function.
He has published papers in Science, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA), Journal of Neuroscience, Proceedings of the Royal Society (UK), Scientific American, and Trends in Cognitive Science. He organized the first public forum on music and brain (at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London) and the first on the cognitive neuroscience of dance (at the Wellcome Institute, London).
His research has been featured in BBC Classic magazine, BBC Radio, BBC-TV, New Scientist, Quo, REDES, llustreret Videnskab, CNN, Los Angeles Times, New York Times, Times of London, and in STERN, Panorama, and VSD magazines, as well as in book and journal translations in Japanese, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese.

 

The discussants on December 7

Eric Clarke is Heather Professor of Music at Oxford, and Professorial Fellow of Wadham College. He has published widely on various issues in the psychology of music, musical meaning, and the analysis of pop music, including Empirical Musicology (OUP 2004, co-edited with Nicholas Cook), Ways of Listening (OUP 2005), The Cambridge Companion to Recorded Music (CUP 2009, co-edited with Nicholas Cook, Daniel Leech-Wilkinson and John
Rink) and Music and Mind in Everyday Life (OUP 2010, co-authored with Nicola Dibben and Stephanie Pitts), and is currently working on an edited volume for OUP on Music and Consciousness (co-edited with David Clarke) and a monograph entitled Musical Subjectivities, also for OUP.  He was an Associate Director of the AHRC Research Centre for the History and Analysis of Recorded Music and is an Associate Director of the successor Centre for Musical Performance as Creative Practice (2009-14). He is on a number of editorial boards including Music Perception, Musicae Scientiae, Empirical Musicology Review, and Radical Musicology, and was elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 2010.

After a PhD in cognitive psychology (Dijon) and postdoctoral research in cognitive neuroscience (Dartmouth College), Barbara Tillmann integrated the laboratory CNRS-UMR 5020 (Lyon) as a CNRS researcher in 2001. Her research is in the domain of auditory cognition and uses behavioural, neurophysiological and computational methods. She investigates how the brain acquires knowledge about complex sound structures, such as music and language, and how this knowledge shapes perception. Since 2007, she is leader of the team “Auditory Cognition and Psychoacoustics”. The team’s research aims to understand cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie how humans perceive, learn, memorize and use complex sound structures. integrated the laboratory CNRS-UMR 5020 (Lyon) as a CNRS researcher in 2001. Her research is in the domain of auditory cognition and uses behavioural, neurophysiological and computational methods. She investigates how the brain acquires knowledge about complex sound structures, such as music and language, and how this knowledge shapes perception. Since 2007, she is leader of the team “Auditory Cognition and Psychoacoustics”. The team’s research aims to understand cognitive and neural mechanisms that underlie how humans perceive, learn, memorize and use complex sound structures.

 

The discussants on December 8

Eckart Altenmüller (b. 1955) holds a Masters degree in Classical flute, and a MD and PhD degree in Neurology and Neurophysiology. Since 1994 he is chair and director of the Institute of Music Physiology and Musicians’ Medicine. He continues research into the neurobiology of emotions and into movement disorders in musicians as well as motor, auditory and sensory learning. During the last ten years, he received 18 grants from the German Research Society (DFG). Since 2005 he is President of the German Society of Music Physiology and Musicians’ Medicine and Member of the Göttingen Academy of Sciences.

Michael Dunn was trained in linguistic typology and language description at the Australian National University, including several stints of fieldwork in the Russian Arctic and the Solomon Islands. Following on from this I have become increasingly interested in the contribution of history to the understanding of large scale patterns of linguistic diversity. Since 2009 I have led the Max Planck Research Group "Evolutionary Processes in Language and Culture", a small group looking at some big questions: why do languages change? When is chance not enough to explain patterns of linguistic diversity? How do culture and environment influence the structure of language?

Last checked 2017-11-20 by nanjo

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