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Conversation Analysis (CA) in Mandarin Chinese

Conversation analysis (CA) is a field and method for the study of talk and other conduct in interaction. The primary goal of CA is to observe, describe, and explicate specific practices and organizations of practices that participants use to coordinate action in interaction. Major topics in CA include turn-taking, sequence organization, repair, preference organization, person reference, and epistemics. In addition to these larger organizations, research also focuses on linguistic practices as well as practices of body behavior.

This page contains references to conversation-analytic research on Mandarin Chinese (written in English). Not included in this list is research in the tradition of discourse-functional linguistics that often draws on conversation analysis but does not apply its methods.

 

Repair

Chen, Helen Kai-yun. 2011. “Sound Patterns in Mandarin Recycling Repair.” Ph.D. dissertation. University of Colorado.

Chui, Kawai. 1996. “Organization of repair in Chinese conversation.” Text - Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of Discourse 16(3): 343-372.

He, Agnes Weiyun. 2011. “The role of repair in modulating modal stances in Chinese discourse.” Chinese Language & Discourse 2(1): 1-22.

Lee, Jee Won. 2010. “Systematic repetition of the first person singular pronoun wo in Mandarin conversation: Negotiation of conflicting stance in interaction.” Chinese Language & Discourse 1(2): 183-219.

Luke, Kang-Kwong, and Wei Zhang. 2010a. “Insertion as a self-repair device and its interactional motivations in Chinese conversation.” Chinese Language & Discourse 1(2): 153-182.

Tao, Hongyin, Barbara Fox, and Jule Gomez de Garcia. 1999. “Tone-choice repair in conversational Mandarin Chinese.” In Cognition and Function in Language, eds. Barbara A. Fox, Dan Jurafsky, and Laura A. Michaelis. Stanford: CSLI, p. 268-281.

Wu, Ruey-Jiuan Regina. 2006. “Initiating Repair and Beyond: The Use of Two Repeat-Formatted Repair Initiations in Mandarin Conversation.” Discourse Processes: A multidisciplinary journal 41(1): 43.

Zhang, Wei. 1998. “Repair in Chinese Conversation.” Ph.D. dissertation. University of Hong Kong.

 

Sequence organization

Hopper, Robert, and Chai-Hui Chen. 1996. “Languages, Cultures, Relationships: Telephone Openings in Taiwan.” Research on Language & Social Interaction 29(4): 291-313.

Sun, Hao. 2002. “Display and Reaffirmation of Affect Bond and Relationship: Invited Guessing in Chinese Telephone Conversations.” Language in Society 31(01): 85-112.

Turk, Monica J. 2006. “Projection in Mandarin Chinese conversation: Grammar and social interaction in question-answer sequences.” Ph.D. dissertation. University of California, Santa Barbara,.

Xu, Jun. 2009. “Displaying overt recipiency: Reactive tokens in Mandarin task-oriented conversation.”

 

Turn construction

Luke, Kang-Kwong, and Wei Zhang. 2010b. “Retrospective Turn Continuations in Mandarin Chinese Conversation.” Pragmatics 17(4).

 

Epistemics

Endo, Tomoko Koike. 2010. “Expressing stance in Mandarin conversation: Epistemic and non-epistemic uses wo juede.” Ph.D. dissertation. University of California, Los Angeles.

Kendrick, Kobin H. 2010. “Epistemics and Action Formation in Mandarin Chinese.” Ph.D. dissertation. University of California, Santa Barbara.

 

Prosody

Wu, Ruey-Jiuan Regina. 2004. Stance in Talk: A Conversation Analysis of Mandarin Final Particles. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Xu, Jun. 2008. “The Prosody of Interrogatives at Transition-Relevance Places in Mandarin Chinese Conversation.”

 

Particles

Kendrick, Kobin H. 2010. “Epistemics and Action Formation in Mandarin Chinese.” Ph.D. dissertation. University of California, Santa Barbara.

Tsai, I-Ni. 2008. “Projecting the Unanticipatory: The Mandarin Particle Ei and its Projectability in Daily Conversation.” In Proceedings of the 20th North American Conference on Chinese Linguistics, Ohio: The Ohio State University, p. 1023-1040.

Wu, Ruey-Jiuan Regina. 2006. “Initiating Repair and Beyond: The Use of Two Repeat-Formatted Repair Initiations in Mandarin Conversation.” Discourse Processes: A multidisciplinary journal 41(1): 43.

Wu, Ruey-Jiuan Regina. 2004. Stance in Talk: A Conversation Analysis of Mandarin Final Particles. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Wu, Ruey-Jiuan Regina. 2005. “‘There is more here than meets the eye!’: the use of final ou in two sequential positions in Mandarin Chinese conversation.” Journal of Pragmatics 37(7): 967-995.

Wu, Ruey-Jiuan Regina. 1997. “Transforming Participation Frameworks in Multi-Party Mandarin Conversation: The Use of Discourse Particles and Body Behavior.” Issues in Applied Linguistics 8(2): 97-118.

 

The body

Wu, Ruey-Jiuan Regina. 1997. “Transforming Participation Frameworks in Multi-Party Mandarin Conversation: The Use of Discourse Particles and Body Behavior.” Issues in Applied Linguistics 8(2): 97-118.

Yang, Ping. 2011. “Nonverbal aspects of turn taking in Mandarin Chinese interaction.” Chinese Language & Discourse 2(1): 99-130.

 

Style and face

Chen, Victoria. 1990. “Mien Tze at the Chinese dinner table: A study of the interactional accomplishment of face.” Research on Language & Social Interaction 24(1-4): 109-140.

Li, Wei, Zhu Hua, and Li Yue. 2001. “Conversational Management and Involvement in Chinese-English Business Talk.” Language and Intercultural Communication 1(2): 135-150.

Wu, Ruey-Jiuan Regina. 2011. “A conversation analysis of self-praising in everyday Mandarin interaction.” Journal of Pragmatics 43(13): 3152-3176.

 

Language learning and bilingualism

He, Agnes Weiyun. 2001. “The Language of Ambiguity: Practices in Chinese Heritage Language Classes.” Discourse Studies 3(1): 75 -96.

Li, Wei. 2005. “‘How can you tell?’: Towards a common sense explanation of conversational code-switching.” Journal of Pragmatics 37(3): 375-389.

Li, Wei. 2002. “On the Conversation Analysis Approach to Bilingual Interaction.” Language in Society 31(02): 159-180.

Last checked 2011-12-06
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Kobin Kendrick

Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
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