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MPI Dissertation series

Since 1997, Ph.D.'s of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics have their theses appear in a series. This MPI Series in Psycholinguistics enables the Institute to make the quality and diversity of its research more visible to the outside world. Here is a list of theses that have appeared so far. Note that the following titles are unpublished dissertations. Anyone interested in a copy is advised to contact the author of the dissertation in question (or, if that fails, the library).

 

  1. The electrophysiology of speaking. Investigations on the time course of semantic, syntactic and phonological processing
    Miranda van Turennout
    1997
  2. The role of the syllable in speech production. Evidence from lexical statistics, metalinguistics, masked priming and electromagnetic midsaggital articulography
    Niels O. Schiller
    1997
  3. Lexical access in the production of ellipsis and pronouns
    Bernadette M. Schmitt
    1997
  4. The open-/closed-class distinction in spoken-word recognition
    Alette Haveman
    1997
  5. The acquisition of phonetic categories in young infants: A self-organising artificial neural network approach
    Kay Behnke
    1998
  6. Gesture and speech production
    Jan-Peter de Ruiter
    1998
  7. Comparative intonational phonology: English and German
    Esther Grabe
    1998
  8. Finiteness in adult and child German
    Ingeborg Lasser
  9. Language input for word discovery
    Joost van de Weijer
    1999
  10. Inherent complement verbs revisited: Towards an understanding of argument structure in Ewe
    James Essegbey
    1999
  11. Producing past and plural inflections
    Dirk Janssen
    1999
  12. Valence and transitivity in Saliba: An Oceanic language of Papua New Guinea
    Anna Margetts
    1999
  13. From speech to words
    Arie van der Lugt
    1999
  14. Simple and complex verbs in Jaminjung: A study of event categorization in an Australian language
    Eva Schultze-Berndt
    2000
  15. Interpreting indefinites: An experimental study of children's language comprehension
    Irene Krämer
    2000
  16. Language specific listening: The case of phonetic sequences
    Andrea Weber
    2001
  17. Moving eyes and naming objects
    Femke van der Meulen
    2001
  18. Analogy in morphology: The selection of linking elements in Dutch compounds
    Andrea Krott
    2001
  19. Morphology in speech comprehension
    Kerstin Mauth
    2002
  20. Morphological families in the mental lexicon
    Nivja H. de Jong
    2002
  21. Fixed expressions and the production of idioms
    Simone A. Sprenger
    2003
  22. The grammatical coding of postural semantics in Goemai
    Birgit Hellwig
    2003
  23. Paradigmatic structures in morphological processing: Computational and cross-linguistic experimental studies
    Fermin Moscoso del Prado Martin
    2003
  24. Contextual influences on spoken-word processing
    Daniëlle van den Brink
    2004
  25. Perceptual relevance of prevoicing in Dutch
    Petra M. van Alphen
    2004
  26. Syllables in speech production: Effects of syllable preparation and syllable frequency
    Joana Cholin
    2004
  27. Producing complex spoken numerals for time and space
    Marjolein Meeuwissen
    2004
  28. Morphology in auditory lexical processing
    Rachèl J.J.K. Kemps
    2004
  29. At the same time ...: The expression of simultaneity in learner varieties
    Barbara Schmiedtová
    2004
  30. A grammar of Jalonke argument structure
    Friederike Lüpke
    2005
  31. Agrammatic comprehension: An electrophysiological approach
    Marlies Wassenaar
    2005
  32. The structure and use of shape-based noun classes in Miraña (North West Amazon)
    Frank Seifart
    2005
  33. Prosodically-conditioned detail in the recognition of spoken words
    Anne Pier Salverda
    2005
  34. Phonetic and lexical processing in a second language
    Mirjam Broersma
    2005
  35. Retrieving semantic and syntactic word properties: ERP studies on the time course in language comprehension
    Oliver Müller
    2006
  36. Lexically-guided perceptual learning in speech processing
    Frank Eisner
    2006
  37. Sensitivity to detailed acoustic information in word recognition
    Keren B. Shatzman
    2006
  38. The relationship between spoken word production and comprehension
    Rebecca Özdemir
    2006
  39. Disfluency: Interrupting speech and gesture
    Mandana Seyfeddinipur
    2006
  40. The acquisition of phonological structure: Distinguishing contrastive from non-contrastive variation
    Christiane Dietrich
    2006
  41. Cognitive cladistics and the relativity of spatial cognition
    Daniel B.M. Haun
    2007
  42. The acquisition of auditory categories
    Martijn Goudbeek
    2007
  43. Affix reduction in spoken Dutch
    Mark Pluymaekers
    2007
  44. Continuous-speech segmentation at the beginning of language acquisition: Electrophysiological evidence
    Valesca Kooijman
    2007
  45. Space and iconicity in German Sign Language (DGS)
    Pamela Perniss
    2007
  46. On the production of morphologically complex words with special attention to effects of frequency
    Heidrun Bien
    2007
  47. Crosslinguistic influence in first and second languages: Convergence in speech and gesture
    Amanda Brown
    2007
  48. The acquisition of verb compounding in Mandarin Chinese
    Jidong Chen
    2008
  49. Phoneme inventories and patterns of speech sound perception
    Anita Wagner
    2008
  50. Lexical processing of morphologically complex words: An information-theoretical perspective
    Victor Kuperman
    2008
  51. A grammar of Savosavo: A Papuan language of the Solomon Islands
    Claudia Wegener
    2008
  52. Prosodic structure in speech perception and production
    Claudia Kuzla
    2009
  53. The acquisition of finiteness by Turkish learners of German and Turkish learners of French: Investigating knowledge of forms and functions in production and comprehension
    Sarah Schimke
    2009
  54. Studies on intonation and information structure in child and adult German
    Laura de Ruiter
    2010
  55. Processing the fine temporal structure of spoken words
    Eva Reinisch
    2010
  56. Semantics and (ir)regular inflection in morphological processing
    Wieke Tabak
    2010
  57. Processing strongly reduced forms in casual speech
    Susanne Brouwer
    2010
  58. Ambiguous pronoun resolution in L1 and L2 German and Dutch
    Miriam Ellert
    2011
  59. Lexical interactions in non-native speech comprehension: Evidence from electro-encephalography, eye-tracking, and functional magnetic resonance imaging
    Ian FitzPatrick
    2011
  60. Processing casual speech in native and non-native language
    Annelie Tuinman
    2011
  61. Split intransitivity in Rotokas, a Papuan language of Bougainville
    Stuart Robinson
    2011
  62. Evidentiality and intersubjectivity in Yurakaré: An interactional account
    Sonja Gipper
    2011
  63. The influence of information structure on language comprehension: A neurocognitive perspective
    Lin Wang
    2011
  64. The meaning and use of ideophones in Siwu
    Mark Dingemanse
    2011
  65. The role of acoustic detail and context in the comprehension of reduced pronunciation variants
    Marco van de Ven
    2011
  66. Speech reduction in spontaneous French and Spanish
    Francisco Torreira
    2011
  67. The relevance of early word recognition: Insights from the infant brain
    Caroline Junge
    2011
  68. Adjusting to different speakers: Extrinsic normalization in vowel perception
    Matthias Sjerps
    2011
  69. Structuring language: Contributions to the neurocognition of syntax
    Katrien R. Segaert
    2012
  70. Infants’ appreciation of others’ mental states in prelinguistic communication
    Birgit Knudsen
    2012
  71. Gaze behavior in face-to-face-interaction
    Federico Rossano
    2012
  72. Sign-spatiality in Kata Kolok: How a village sign language of Bali inscribes its signing space
    Connie de Vos
    2012
  73. Who is talking?
    Attila Andics
    2013
  74. Lexical processing of foreign-accented speech: Rapid and flexible adaptation
    Marijt Witteman
    2013
  75. The use of deictic versus representational gestures in infancy
    Daniel Puccini
    2013
  76. Territories of knowledge in Japanese conversation. Kaoru Hayano. 2013
  77. Family and neighbourhood relations in the mental lexicon: A cross-language perspective. Kimberley Mulder. 2013
  78. Contributions of executive control to individual differences in word productions. Zeshu Shao. 2013
  79. Hearing and seeing speech: Perceptual adjustments in auditory-visual processing . Patrick van der Zande. 2013
  80. High pitches and thick voices: The role of language in space-pitich association. Sarah Dolscheid. 2013
  81. Seeing what's next: Processing and anticipating language referring to objects. Joost Rommers. 2013
  82. Mental representations and processing of reduced words in casual speech. Iris Hanique. 2013
  83. The many ways listeners adapt to reductions in casual speech. Katja Poellmann.  2013
  84. Contrasting opposite polarity in Germanic and Romance languages: Verum Focus and affirmative particles in native speakers and advanced L2 learners Giuseppe Turco. 2014  [pdf]

  85. Morphological processing in younger and older people: Evidence for flexible dual-route access. Jana Reifegerste. 2014

  86. Semantic and syntactic constraints on the production of subject-verb agreement. Alma Veenstra. 2014

  87. The acquisition of morphophonological alternations across languages. Helen Buckler. 2014.[pdf]
  88. The evolutionary dynamics of motion event encoding. Annemarie Verkerk. 2014

  89. Rediscovering a forgotten language. Jiyoun Choi. 2014

  90. The road to native listening: Language-general perception, language-specific input. Sho Tsuji. 2014

  91. Infants' understanding of communication as participants and observers. Gudmundur Bjarki Thorgrímsson. 2014
  92.  Information structure in Avatime. Saskia van Putten. 2014
  93.  Switch reference in Whitesands. Jeremy Hammond. 2015
Last checked 2015-01-06 by Rian Zondervan
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The Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics is an institute of the German Max Planck Society. Our mission is to undertake basic research into the psychological,social and biological foundations of language. The goal is to understand how our minds and brains process language, how language interacts with other aspects of mind, and how we can learn languages of quite different types.

The institute is situated on the campus of the Radboud University. We participate in the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, and have particularly close ties to that institute's Centre for Cognitive Neuroimaging. We also participate in the Centre for Language Studies. A joint graduate school, the IMPRS in Language Sciences, links the Donders Institute, the CLS and the MPI.

 

 

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