Monique Flecken

Presentations

Displaying 1 - 18 of 18
  • Fleur, D., Flecken, M., Rommers, J., & Nieuwland, M. S. (2019). Definitely saw it coming? An ERP study on the role of article gender and definiteness in predictive processing. Poster presented at the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language (SNL 2019), Helsinki, Finland.
  • Flecken, M., & Gerwien, J. (2018). It’s time to prime time!. Poster presented at the International Workshop on Language Production (IWLP 2018), Nijmegen, Netherlands.
  • Misersky, J., Peeters, D., & Flecken, M. (2017). The virtual reality of events of motion (VROEM). Poster presented at the workshop 'Event Representations in Brain, Language & Development' (EvRep), Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  • Flecken, M. (2016). Perceiving through the language lens: how language influences our perception [Invited talk]. Talk presented at the Taal en Wereldbeeld Conference. University of Groningen, the Netherlands. 2016-03.
  • Flecken, M., & Van Bergen, G. (2016). Putting things in place(s): Linguistic experience guides event perception [Invited talk]. Talk presented at the Grammar and Cognition colloquium. University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. 2016-04.
  • Flecken, M., & Stutterheim, C. (2016). Progressive aspect: Language-specific function and conceptual implications [Invited talk]. Talk presented at the What’s up, Switzerland! Conference. University of Bern, Switzerland. 2016-06.
  • Flecken, M., & Van Bergen, G. (2016). The English can’t stand the bottle like the Dutch: ERPs show an effect of language on object perception. Poster presented at the Eighth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language (SNL 2016), London.

    Abstract

    Previous research shows that linguistic labels affect perception, reflected in modulations of ERP components (P1/N1/P300; Thierry et al. 2009; Boutonnet et al. 2013). Here, we go beyond terminology to examine how perception is influenced by argument features of verbs: Dutch uses posture verbs (staan/liggen ‘stand/lie’) to describe locations of objects, encoding object position (Lemmens 2002). In contrast, position is not obligatorily encoded in English (‘there is a cup on the table’). We ask, whether this difference is reflected in object perception, by recording ERPs in English and Dutch participants during a picture-matching task. Dutch (N=28) and English (N=26) participants saw sequentially presented pairs of pictures (N=400), each showing an object on a surface (e.g., a suitcase on a table). Each object (N=10) was manipulated across two spatial dimensions, i.e., rotated 90 degrees along the horizontal or the vertical axis. The former manipulation reflects the obligatorily encoded position distinction in Dutch verbs. Participants pressed a button only when they saw a different object in the second picture. We used an oddball design with four conditions: (a) Object Match (frequent condition, 70% of trials), (b) Object Mismatch (response oddball, 10%), (c) Orientation Mismatch (control distracter oddball, 10%), and (d) Position Mismatch (critical distracter oddball, 10%). ERPs were time-locked to the onset of the second picture. Analyses revealed a significant Language by Condition interaction on amplitudes of an early component associated with automatic and prelexical perceptual discrimination processes (the N100, the earliest negative going peak; cf. Boutonnet et al. 2013): Whereas an enhanced N100 was obtained for the response condition in both groups, Position Mismatch oddballs elicited an N100 modulation only in Dutch participants. In sum, Dutch participants displayed increased selective attention to verbally encoded object features, before this information can be accessed lexically, adding to the evidence that language affects our perception of the world. References: Boutonnet, B., Dering, B., Vinas-Guasch, N., & Thierry. G. (2013). Seeing objects through the language glass. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 25 (10), 1702-1710. Lemmens, M. (2002). The semantic network of Dutch posture verbs. In J. Newman (Ed.), The linguistics of sitting,standing and lying (pp 103–139). Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Thierry, G., Athanasopoulos, P., Wiggett, A., Dering, B., & Kuipers, JR. (2009). Unconscious effects of language-specific terminology on pre-attentive color perception. PNAS, 106 (11), 4567–4570.
  • Gerwien, J., & Flecken, M. (2016). First things first? Top-down influences on event apprehension. Talk presented at the 38th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2016). Philadelphia, US. 2016-08-11 - 2016-08-13.

    Abstract

    Not much is known about event apprehension, the earliest stage of information processing in elicited language production studies, using pictorial stimuli. A reason for our lack of knowledge on this process is that apprehension happens very rapidly (<350 ms after stimulus onset, Griffin & Bock 2000), making it difficult to measure the process directly. To broaden our understanding of apprehension, we analyzed landing positions and onset latencies of first fixations on visual stimuli (pictures of real-world events) given short stimulus presentation times, presupposing that the first fixation directly results from information processing during apprehension
  • Sakarias, M., & Flecken, M. (2017). The result is in sight: Grammatical encoding of resultativity influences event perception and memory. Talk presented at the 30th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing. MIT, Boston. 2017-03-30 - 2017-04-01.
  • Van Bergen, G., & Flecken, M. (2017). Searching for the label advantage in perception: to what extent do verbal categories facilitate visual search?. Poster presented at the 30th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, MIT, Boston.
  • Van Bergen, G., & Flecken, M. (2016). The English can’t stand the bottle like the Dutch. ERPs show effect of language on object perception. Talk presented at the 29th Annual CUNY conference on Human Sentence Processing. University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. 2016-03-03 - 2016-03-05.
  • Flecken, M., & Van Bergen, G. (2015). To stand or to lie, that's the question! ERPs show effect of language on object perception. Poster presented at the 21st Annual Conference on Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing (AMLaP 2015), Malta.
  • Gerwien, J., & Flecken, M. (2015). Structural priming in the production of progressive aspect in Dutch. Poster presented at the 28th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, Los Angeles, CA.
  • Van Bergen, G., & Flecken, M. (2015). Putting things in new places: Language- vs. learner-specific factors in predictive sentence processing. Poster presented at the 28th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing, Los Angeles, CA.
  • Flecken, M. (2014). A cross-linguistic perspective on event encoding [Invited talk]. Talk presented at the Department of Education. University of York, UK. 2014-11.
  • Flecken, M., & Van Bergen, G. (2014). Putting things in new places: Verb-based prediction in L1 and L2 sentence processing. Poster presented at the 20th Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing Conference (AMLAP 2014), Edinburgh, UK.
  • Van Bergen, G., & Flecken, M. (2014). Putting things in place incrementally. Talk presented at the Embodied and Situated Language Processing Conference 2014. Rotterdam, the Netherlands. 2014-08-19 - 2014-08-21.
  • Walbert, K., & Flecken, M. (2014). “Right now, Sophie *swims in the pool?!” Processing of grammatical aspect in native and second language readers. Poster presented at the 20th Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing Conference (AMLAP 2014), Edinburgh, UK.

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