Publications

Displaying 1 - 16 of 16
  • Bowerman, M. (1974). Learning the structure of causative verbs: A study in the relationship of cognitive, semantic, and syntactic development. Papers and Reports on Child Language Development, 8, 142-178.
  • Bowerman, M. (1978). Systematizing semantic knowledge: Changes over time in the child's organization of word meaning. Child Development, 49(4), 977-987.

    Abstract

    Selected spontaneous errors of word choice made between the ages of about 2 and 5 by 2 children whose language development has been followed longitudinally were analyzed for clues to semantic development. The errors involved the children's occasional replacement of a contextually required word by a semantically similar word after weeks or months of using both words appropriately. Because the errors were not present from the beginning and because correct usage prevailed most of the time, the errors cannot be explained by existing accounts of semantic development, which ascribe children's word-choice errors to initial linguistic immaturity. A plausible alternative account likens the errors to adult "slips of the tongue" in which the speaker, in the process of constructing a sentence to express a given meaning, chooses incorrectly among competing semantically related words. Interpreted in this way, the errors indicate that the process of drawing words into structured semantic systems based on shared meaning components begins much earlier than experimental studies have suggested. They also provide evidence for certain differences between children and adults in the planning and monitoring of speech.
  • Cutler, A., & Cooper, W. E. (1978). Phoneme-monitoring in the context of different phonetic sequences. Journal of Phonetics, 6, 221-225.

    Abstract

    The order of some conjoined words is rigidly fixed (e.g. dribs and drabs/*drabs and dribs). Both phonetic and semantic factors can play a role in determining the fixed order. An experiment was conducted to test whether listerners’ reaction times for monitoring a predetermined phoneme are influenced by phonetic constraints on ordering. Two such constraints were investigated: monosyllable-bissyllable and high-low vowel sequences. In English, conjoined words occur in such sequences with much greater frequency than their converses, other factors being equal. Reaction times were significantly shorter for phoneme monitoring in monosyllable-bisyllable sequences than in bisyllable- monosyllable sequences. However, reaction times were not significantly different for high-low vs. low-high vowel sequences.
  • Kempen, G. (1978). Psychologie een cognitieve wetenschap. De Psycholoog, 13, 566-574.
  • Klein, W. (1974). Critical remarks on generative metrics. Poetics, 12, 29-48.
  • Klein, W., & Levelt, W. J. M. (1978). Sprache und Kontext. Naturwissenschaften, 65, 328-335. doi:10.1007/BF00368373.

    Abstract

    Recently, the Max Planck Society founded a new Project group for Psycholinguistics. This article reviews some of the kernel issues of the group's research program. The central concern is with the context dependency of the speaker's linguistic behavior. The process of linguistically formulating depends not only on what the speaker wants to express, but also on what has been said previously (linguistic context), and on the physical and social situation (nonlinguistic context). Special attention is paid to two context-dependent phenomena.
  • Klein, W. (1978). Wo ist hier? Präliminarien zu einer Untersuchung der lokalen Deixis. Linguistische Berichte, 58, 18-40.
  • Levelt, W. J. M. (1974). J.B. Carroll & R. Freedle (eds.), Language comprehension and the acquisition of knowledge [Book review]. The Quarterly journal of experimental psychology, 26(2), 325-326. doi:10.1080/14640747408400419.
  • Levelt, W. J. M., & Schreuder, R. (1978). Psychologische theorieën over het lexicon. Forum der Letteren, 19, 40-58.
  • Levelt, W. J. M. (1978). Skill theory and language teaching. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1(1), 53-70. doi:10.1017/S0272263100000711.
  • Levinson, S. C. (1978). Comment on Beck's theory of metaphor. Current Anthropology, 19(1), 92-92.
  • Noordman, L. G. M., & Levelt, W. J. M. (1978). The noun-verb intersection method for the study of word meanings. Methodology and Science, 11, 86-113.
  • Seuren, P. A. M. (1978). Graadadjektieven en oriëntatie. Gramma, 2(1), 1-29.
  • Seuren, P. A. M. (1963). Naar aanleiding van Dr. F. Balk-Smit Duyzentkunst "De Grammatische Functie". Levende Talen, 219, 179-186.
  • Van de Geer, J. P., & Levelt, W. J. M. (1963). Detection of visual patterns disturbed by noise: An exploratory study. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 15, 192-204. doi:10.1080/17470216308416324.

    Abstract

    An introductory study of the perception of stochastically specified events is reported. The initial problem was to determine whether the perceiver can split visual input data of this kind into random and determined components. The inability of subjects to do so with the stimulus material used (a filmlike sequence of dot patterns), led to the more general question of how subjects code this kind of visual material. To meet the difficulty of defining the subjects' responses, two experiments were designed. In both, patterns were presented as a rapid sequence of dots on a screen. The patterns were more or less disturbed by “noise,” i.e. the dots did not appear exactly at their proper places. In the first experiment the response was a rating on a semantic scale, in the second an identification from among a set of alternative patterns. The results of these experiments give some insight in the coding systems adopted by the subjects. First, noise appears to be detrimental to pattern recognition, especially to patterns with little spread. Second, this shows connections with the factors obtained from analysis of the semantic ratings, e.g. easily disturbed patterns show a large drop in the semantic regularity factor, when only a little noise is added.
  • De Weert, C., & Levelt, W. J. M. (1974). Binocular brightness combinations: Additive and nonadditive aspects. Perception and Psychophysics, 15, 551-562.

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