Tineke Snijders

Presentations

Displaying 1 - 36 of 36
  • Cetincelik, M., Rowland, C. F., & Snijders, T. M. (2020). The effects of eye gaze on infants’ language learning: A systematic review. Poster presented at the Virtual International Congress of Infant Studies (vICIS 2020), Glasgow, UK.
  • Menn, K., Ward, E., Brauckmann, R., Van den Boomen, C., Kemner, C., Buitelaar, J., Hunnius, S., & Snijders, T. M. (2020). Relating neural entrainment to speech to later development of language and autism symptoms in infants with high likelihood of ASD. Poster presented at the Virtual International Congress of Infant Studies (vICIS 2020), Glasgow, UK.
  • Snijders, T. M. (2020). Infants’ cortical tracking of speech rhythm at 7.5 months relates to their word segmentation performance at 9 months. Poster presented at the 26th Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing Conference (AMLap 2020), Potsdam, Germany.
  • Snijders, T. M. (2020). Tracking speech rhythm in the 7.5 month old infant brain is related to word segmentation performance at 9 months. Talk presented at the Virtual International Congress of Infant Studies (vICIS 2020). Glasgow, UK. 2020-07-06 - 2020-07-09.
  • Snijders, T. M. (2020). Individual variability in infants’ cortical tracking of speech rhythm relates to their word segmentation performance. Poster presented at the Twelfth Annual (Virtual) Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language (SNL 2020).
  • Snijders, T. M. (2020). Individual variability in infants’ cortical tracking of speech rhythm relates to their word segmentation performance. Talk presented at Many Paths to Language (virtual MPaL 2020). Nijmegen, The Netherlands. 2020-10-22 - 2020-10-23.
  • Snijders, T. M. (2020). Getting the rhythm for infant language learning: infants’ cortical tracking of speech rhythm relates to their word segmentation performance. Talk presented at the 45th Annual Boston University (Virtual) Conference on Language Development (BUCLD 45). Boston, MA, USA. 2020-11-05 - 2020-11-08.
  • Visser, F. M. H. G., Rommers, L., Arana, S., Kösem, A., & Snijders, T. M. (2020). Rhythm-based word segmentation and its relation to speech-brain coherence in Dutch 9-month-olds. Poster presented at Many Paths to Language (virtual MPaL 2020), Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  • Vissers, F. M. H. G., Rommers, L., Arana, S., Kösem, A., & Snijders, T. M. (2020). Rhythm-based word segmentation and its relation to speech-brain coherence in 9-month-old infants. Poster presented at the 26th Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing Conference (AMLap 2020), Potsdam, Germany.
  • Hahn, L. E., Benders, T., Snijders, T. M., & Fikkert, P. (2019). Segmenting clauses in song and speech – absence of evidence for easier segmentation of song. Poster presented at the 4th Workshop on Infant Language Development (WILD 2019), Potsdam, Germany.
  • Hahn, L. E., ten Buuren, M., de Nijs, M., Snijders, T. M., & Fikkert, P. (2019). Acquiring novel words in a second language through mutual play with child songs - the Noplica Energy Center. Talk presented at the EuNet Meryc Conference 2019: Counterpoints of the Senses: Bodily Experiences in Musical Learning. Ghent, Belgium. 2019-03-26 - 2019-03-30.
  • Hahn, L. E., Snijders, T. M., Benders, T., & Fikkert, P. (2019). Behavioral and electrophysiological evidence for early rhyme sensitivity. Talk presented at the Workshop on "Prosody from a cross-domain perspective: How language speaks to music (and vice versa)”, at DGfS 2019 – The 41st Annual Conference of the German Linguistic Society. Bremen, Germany. 2019-03-06 - 2019-03-08.
  • Snijders, T. M. (2019). Getting the rhythm for infant language learning. Talk presented at the Workshop on "Prosody from a cross-domain perspective: How language speaks to music (and vice versa)”, at DGfS 2019 – The 41st Annual Conference of the German Linguistic Society. Bremen, Germany. 2019-03-06 - 2019-03-08.
  • Van den Boomen, C., Fahrenfort, J. J., Snijders, T. M., & Kemner, C. (2019). Slow segmentation of faces in Autism Spectrum Disorder. Poster presented at the 19th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS), St. Pete Beach, Florida, USA.
  • Hahn, L. E., Snijders, T. M., Benders, T., & Fikkert, P. (2018). Infants’ perception of linguistic information in songs. Talk presented at DGfS 2018: 40th Annual Conference of the German Linguistic Society. Stuttgart, Germany. 2018-03-07 - 2018-03-09.
  • Snijders, T. M. (2018). Baby brains dancing - relating infants’ neuronal sensitivity to rhythm to their later language development. Talk presented at the Typical and Atypical Language Acquisition Seminar Series. Potsdam, Germany. 2018-05-17.
  • Snijders, T. M. (2018). Cleaning infant EEG data with ICA. Talk presented at Baby Circle Meeting. Utrecht, The Netherlands. 2018.
  • Hahn, L. E., Benders, T., Snijders, T. M., & Fikkert, P. (2017). Infants' recognition of phrases in song and speech. Talk presented at the 14th International Congress for the Study of Child Language (IASCL 2017). Lyon, France. 2017-07-17 - 2017-07-21.
  • Hahn, L. E., Benders, T., Snijders, T. M., & Fikkert, P. (2017). Infants' sensitivity to rhyme in songs. Poster presented at Many Paths to Language (MPaL), Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  • Snijders, T. M., Schmits, I., & Haegens, S. (2017). Babies and beeps - entrainment to rhythm and temporal prediction in 7.5-month-old infants. Poster presented at the 13th International Conference for Cognitive Neuroscience (ICON), Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
  • Snijders, T. M., Benders, T., Junge, C., Haegens, S., & Fikkert, P. (2017). Babies and beeps – relating infants’ sensitivity to rhythm to their speech segmentation ability. Poster presented at the 3rd Workshop on Infant Language Development (WILD 2017), Bilbao, Spain.
  • Snijders, T. M., Benders, T., Junge, C., Haegens, S., & Fikkert, P. (2017). Relating infants’ sensitivity to rhythm at 7.5 months to their speech segmentation ability at 9 months. Poster presented at Many Paths to Language (MPaL), Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  • Snijders, T. M., Benders, T., & Fikkert, P. (2017). Segmentation of words from song in 10-month-old infants. Talk presented at the 14th International Congress for the Study of Child Language (IASCL 2017. Lyon, France. 2017-07-17 - 2017-07-21.
  • Snijders, T. M. (2017). Song and rhythm for language acquisition. Talk presented at the workshop "The Acquisition and Use of Prosodic Cues". Utrecht, The Netherlands. 2017.
  • Arana, S., Rommers, L., Hagoort, P., Snijders, T. M., & Kösem, A. (2016). The role of entrained oscillations during foreign language listening. Poster presented at the 2nd Workshop on Psycholinguistic Approaches to Speech Recognition in Adverse Conditions (PASRAC), Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
  • Benders, T., Snijders, T. M., & Fikkert, P. (2016). Songs for early word segmentation. Talk presented at the Developing Mind Series - Developmental Perspectives on Language Processing. Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. 2016-05-12 - 2016-05-13.
  • Hahn, L. E., Benders, T., Snijders, T. M., & Fikkert, P. (2016). Sequences of cold pizza - Infants' recognition of phrases in song and speech. Talk presented at the 2nd Workshop on Psycholinguistic Approaches to Speech Recognition in Adverse Conditions. Nijmegen, The Netherlands. 2016-10-31 - 2016-11-01.
  • Ormel, E., Giezen, M., Van Zuilen, M., Snijders, T. M., Smoll, L., & Schiller, N. (2016). Effects of iconicity on sign language processing – an ERP study. Talk presented at the 12th Conference on Theoretical Issues in Sign Language Research. Melbourne, Australia. 2016-01-04 - 2016-01-07.
  • Snijders, T. M., Benders, T., & Fikkert, P. (2016). Segmentation of words from song in 10-month-old infants. Poster presented at the Eighth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language (SNL 2016), London, UK.

    Abstract

    Infant-directed songs are rhythmic with exaggerated intonation. These properties promote word segmentation from speech (Jusczyk et al 1999, Johnson & Jusczyk 2001, Mannel & Friederici 2013). Does that mean that infants are particularly good in segmenting words from songs? We measured EEG while we exposed forty 10-month-old Dutch infants to songs and stories, in each of which a word was repeated across phrases. Segmentation of the repeated word was inferred from the ERP familiarity effect (Kooijman et al 2005, Junge et al 2014), comparing the last two presentations to the first two presentations of the repeated word. Contrary to earlier work investigating speech only (Junge et al 2014), in our data there was no significant ERP familiarity effect within the speech condition, suggesting our infants did not segment the words from speech. However, in the song condition we identified a positive shift in the ERP, 300-900 ms after onset of the repeated word, over left frontal electrodes (p<.05 corrected for multiple comparisons). This suggests that the infants are able to segment words from song. Our failure to identify segmentation from speech might be due to the fact that our speech material was less child-directed than in the study of Junge and colleagues (see Floccia et al 2016). Our results suggest that the brain of 10-month-old infants uses the rhythmic and melodic properties of song to detect salient events and to segment words from the continuous auditory input.
  • Benders, T., Snijders, T. M., & Fikkert, P. (2015). Songs for early word learning – an electrophysiological study. Talk presented at the Workshop on Infant Speech Perception,(WISP). Sydney, Australia. 2015-09-01 - 2015-09-02.
  • Hahn, L. E., Benders, T., & Snijders, T. M. (2015). Infants’ sensitivity to rhyme in songs. Poster presented at the 2nd Workshop on Infant Language Development (WILD 2015), Stockholm, Sweden.
  • Peeters, D., Snijders, T. M., Hagoort, P., & Ozyurek, A. (2015). The role of left inferior frontal gyrus in the integration of pointing gestures and speech. Talk presented at the 4th GESPIN - Gesture & Speech in Interaction Conference. Nantes, France. 2015-09-02 - 2015-09-04.
  • Peeters, D., Snijders, T. M., Hagoort, P., & Ozyurek, A. (2015). The neural integration of pointing gesture and speech in a visual context: An fMRI study. Poster presented at the 7th Annual Society for the Neurobiology of Language Conference (SNL 2015), Chigaco, USA.
  • Udden, J., Snijders, T. M., Fisher, S. E., & Hagoort, P. (2015). A common variant of the CNTNAP2 gene is associated with structural variation in the dorsal visual stream and language-related regions of the right hemisphere. Poster presented at the 7th Annual Society for the Neurobiology of Language Conference (SNL 2015), Chigaco, USA.
  • Dimitrova, D. V., Snijders, T. M., & Hagoort, P. (2014). Neurobiological attention mechanisms of syntactic and prosodic focusing in spoken language. Poster presented at the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language (SNL 2014), Amsterdam.

    Abstract

    IIn spoken utterances important or new information is often linguistically marked, for instance by prosody or syntax. Such highlighting prevents listeners from skipping over relevant information. Linguistic cues like pitch accents lead to a more elaborate processing of important information (Wang et al., 2011). In a recent fMRI study, Kristensen et al. (2013) have shown that the neurobiological signature of pitch accents is linked to the domain-general attention network. This network includes the superior and inferior parietal cortex. It is an open question whether non-prosodic markers of focus (i.e. the important/new information) function similarly on the neurobiological level, that is by recruiting the domaingeneral attention network. This study tried to address this question by testing a syntactic marker of focus. The present fMRI study investigates the processing of it-clefts, which highlight important information syntactically, and compares it to the processing of pitch accents, which highlight information prosodically. We further test if both linguistic focusing devices recruit domain-general attention mechanisms. In the language task, participants listened to short stories like “In the beginning of February the final exam period was approaching. The student did not read the lecture notes”. In the last sentence of each story, the new information was focused either by a pitch accent as in “He borrowed the BOOK from the library” or by an it-cleft like “It was the book that he borrowed from the library”. Pitch accents were pronounced without exaggerated acoustic emphasis. Two control conditions were included: (i) sentences with fronted focus like “The book he borrowed from the library”, to account for word order differences between sentences with clefts and accents, and (ii) sentences without prosodic emphasis like ”He borrowed the book from the library”. In the attentional localizer task (adopted from Kristensen et al., 2013), participants listened to tones in a dichotic listening paradigm. A cue tone was presented in one ear and participants responded to a target tone presented either in the same or the other ear. In line with Kristensen et al. (2013), we found that in the localizer task cue tones activated the right inferior parietal cortex and the precuneus, and we found additional activations in the right superior temporal gyrus. In the language task, sentences with it- clefts elicited larger activations in the left and right superior temporal gyrus as compared to control sentences with fronted focus. For the contrast between sentences with pitch accent vs. without pitch accent we observed activation in the inferior parietal lobe, this activation did however not survive multiple comparisons correction. In sum, our findings show that syntactic focusing constructions like it-clefts recruit the superior temporal gyri, similarly to cue tones in the localizer task. Highlighting focus by pitch accent activated the parietal cortex in areas overlapping with those reported by Kristensen et al. and with those we found for cue tones in the localizer task. Our study provides novel evidence that prosodic and syntactic focusing devices likely have a distinct neurobiological signature in spoken language comprehension.
  • Fonteijn, H. M., Acheson, D. J., Petersson, K. M., Segaert, K., Snijders, T. M., Udden, J., Willems, R. M., & Hagoort, P. (2014). Overlap and segregation in activation for syntax and semantics: a meta-analysis of 13 fMRI studies. Poster presented at the Sixth Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language (SNL 2014), Amsterdam.

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